Found an Electronic Tag? Contact Us Today and Claim Your Reward!

 

Tag Recovery in the Atlantic Ocean

Found an archival tag?
Get your $1,000 reward!
Found a pop-up satellite tag?
Get your $500 reward!
How to tell if a fish has an archival tag:
Archival tags are implanted in the body cavity of the tuna, and only the light sensor protrudes out of the body. However, archival-tagged bluefin also carry unique external conventional streamer tags with two-tone coloration to help fisherman recognize these fish. The external tags are placed about an inch off the dorsal midline on each side of the fish. On the white portion of the streamer tag it says "electronic tag inside cavity," and on the green side it says "Big $$$ reward".
How to tell if a fish has a pop-up satellite tag:
Pop-up tags are approximately 13.5 inches long and are darted into the fish on either side of the dorsal midline. If the tag has already released from the fish, the fish will still carry a conventional streamer tag stating that the fish once carried a pop-up tag. Even this streamer tag alone is of great scientific value and is eligible for a reward. It is also possible to find a post-release pop-up tag that has washed up on the beach or is floating at sea.

How to remove the tag and get your reward:
1. Report all archival-tagged bluefin tuna to your local fisheries agency:
In the West Atlantic, call 1-800-437-3936.
In the East Atlantic/Mediterranean, call ICCAT in Madrid, Spain, at 34-1-579-3352.
Additional instructions will be provided regarding where and how the tags should be mailed. Inquires can also be made to Dr. Eric Prince at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2. DO NOT DRESS THE FISH OR ATTEMPT TO REMOVE THE ARCHIVAL TAG BY PULLING ON THE LIGHT SENSOR. To remove the archival tag, make a carefully placed 6-inch incision in the belly cavity, in front of the area where the sensor enters into the fish. Remove the silver or yellow archival tag (with light sensor attached) by hand. Wash the tag with water and keep it at room temperature. Cut off the streamer tags and keep the portion of the tags with writing or information. In addition to saving both the archival and streamer tags, data on location and date of recapture, fishing gear used, length, weight of fish, and your name and address are also important. 

Click here to download a pdf of the full archival tag reward poster.


How to remove the tag and get your reward:

1. Report all satellite-tagged bluefin tuna immediately to the NOAA Fisheries Service at 1-800-437-3936. Additional instructions will be provided regarding where and how the tags should be mailed.
2. Please remove the pop-up tag and the conventional streamer tag by cutting the monofilament and carefully stowing them. In addition to saving the pop-up and streamer tags, data on location and date of recapture, fishing gear used, length, weight of fish, and your name and address are also important.

For more information on regulations related to electronic tagging of Atlantic highly migratory species and tag recovery, click here to view § 635.33 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

back to top

 

 

Tag Recovery in the Pacific Ocean

Found an archival tag?
Get your $250 reward!
Found a pop-up satellite tag?
Get your $500 reward!
How to tell if a fish has an archival tag:
Archival tags are implanted in the body cavity of the tuna, and only the light sensor protrudes out of the body. However, archival-tagged bluefin also carry unique external conventional streamer tags with two-tone coloration to help fisherman recognize these fish. The external tags are placed about an inch off the dorsal midline on each side of the fish. On the white portion of the streamer tag it says "electronic tag inside cavity," and on the green side it says "Big $$$ reward".
How to tell if a fish has a pop-up satellite tag:
Pop-up tags are approximately 13.5 inches long and are darted into the fish on either side of the dorsal midline. If the tag has already released from the fish, the fish will still carry a conventional streamer tag stating that the fish once carried a pop-up tag. Even this streamer tag alone is of great scientific value and is eligible for a reward. It is also possible to find a post-release pop-up tag that has washed up on the beach or is floating at sea.

How to return the tag and get your reward:
Regardless of whether it is an archival or a pop-up tag, report the tag immediately to one of the following contacts for instructions on how to return the tag and claim your reward:

 

Barbara A. Block/Charles Farwell
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, CA 93940
ph: 1-866-292-6726
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
CICESE- Oscar Sosa Nishizaki Ensenada
Baja California, C. P. 22800 Mexico
ph: 01-646 -137-6335

back to top